Wide awake, Daniel paced aimlessly along the meandering alley ways of Tullbury. Only the sombre glow, and the smell of a cigarette accompanied him. As he mulled over thoughts of his daughter. Daniel came to a stop, staring at a piece of graffiti that was plastered on a redbrick wall. It was a large bloodshot […]

River and Soil

By J.A Scarrott Deep within a vast green woodland, that lay in the heart of England, resided two brothers. River and Soil. River was the taller of the two boys, brown scruffy hair sat upon his head and a had pair of bright blue eyes. He was large, strong, and enjoyed venturing out on frequent hunts into the forest. He equally enjoyed eating the spoils gained through this pass time. His brother, Soil, was a small timid fellow with a set of dark earth green eyes. He found pleasure in the simpler things that life had to offer and only ate produce that he grew from the land. Many a time whilst River was out hunting the wild life, Soil could be found tending a small garden that he cultivated within the centre of the wood. Despite their difference, the brothers were good friends. The two of them had lived together in isolation for many years and they knew nothing of the world that lay beyond it. The wood was their home and it was their life. As the years went by Soil grew and found himself questioning his brothers actions. Watching him return home from the hunt each day with more and more animals slung over his shoulder. Until one day, when the two of them were sat by an roaring camp fire, he finally decided to ask his brother about it. Soil was slowing roasting a potato over the naked flame sitting before him, whilst watching River sink his teeth into a fat steaming chicken leg. Soil cringed as River slurped up the skin off the cooked leg in a single swift motion. “River, May I ask you a question?” Soil asked quietly, looking up through the crackling flames. River licked his lips, not wanting to waste the wet chicken fat that dripped from his mouth. “Of course younger brother, what troubles you?” “Why do you eat the flesh of the animals?” Soil withdrew his potato from the flames and poked it’s black crispy skin. “Well that’s because I am a man!” River bellowed, waving the leg of chicken in his hand. “And men eat animals! It is the way of the world.” Instantly he returned his attention to the meat he was holding and began to gnaw away at it once again. Soil looked down blankly at the potato in his hand, thinking about his older brothers words. He cracked open the tough outer skin and steam bellowed out as it revealed a soft yellow centre. “In that case, Am I less of a man for not eating meat?” River pondered the thought, “Well, no. You are my brother and as much as a man as I…” “So why is it that you eat the flesh of the animals and why do you increasingly eat more than you need?” Soil persisted, not satisfied with the answers that his brother had given him. “I do not understand.” River lifted up a dead fox that lay beside him, which he had caught whilst hunting previously that morning. “These are just mindless animals.” He shook the limp creature violently, “We are human. These animals were put here for the sole purpose of feeding us. What other reason would they have to exist?” He threw the fox to the floor, it’s body let out a loud crack. “But say that you weren’t here in the forest. Would these animals still exist?” “Of course.” “Then how can you say their existence is depended on you? If you weren’t here the animals of this forest would still go on living, which would imply that they have a difference purpose, that isn’t feeding humans, one which you have failed to see.” “Please tell me then what purpose a measly mouse serves.” River scoffed, folding his well muscled arms across his chest. “I do not know, But I never professed to know.” “Look Soil, Animals eat other animals all of the time, what’s the difference?” “That is true, however they have no knowledge of farming. A fox cannot grow crops and the owl cannot sew seeds. But we have been gifted with this knowledge, if we’re able to grow food enough to feed us, then killing animals to eat is just unnecessary, and avoidable, death.” Soil looked over sadly at the limp fox that was slumped next to his brother, it’s orange fur flickered in the light of the fire. River was getting annoyed at his brothers constant questioning and blurted out in retaliation, “Why are you so bothered about them anyway!?” “I don’t know… I suppose it’s because, we’re different to animals. We know more and are in a better position to help them. So we should act upon that and help those, who cannot help themselves.” River leaped up onto his feet, towering above the roaring fire, much like an angered demon raising from the depths of hell. “I’ve had enough of your questions! I don’t care for your reasoning. I’m not going to stop eating the flesh of the animals, for one reason alone, I enjoy it!” He snatched the limp fox off of the floor and stormed off, fading into the darkness of the woods. Soil watched as his brother disappeared. He calmly picked up another potato from the pile that lay next to him, skewed it onto a sharpened stick and placed it in the camp fire. He spent the rest of the night alone, listening to the friendly chirp of crickets that sung an evening song around him. The days passed by and Soil saw no sign of his brother. He continued to tend to his garden and assured himself that his brother was in no danger and would soon return. Weeks passed by and there was still no sign of River. Soil paced around the woods, looking for any faint trail or hint of his where a bouts. But Soil found nothing. He returned once again to his garden and gingerly cared for his crops, leaving his brother to continue with his escapade. The plants in his garden grew taller, his vegetables grew larger, his bean sprouts eventually weaved and spun their way around the fixings that he had made for them. However the forest was growing quiet and that unnerved him greatly. It had been many months since Soil had last seen his brother at the camp fire and in the passing time he had seen much less of the colourful and vibrant fauna that once made the forest come to life. Until eventually the woodland became completely still and silent. The bird song had completely vanished from the early morning air and the cricket’s lullabies had faded from the day’s twilight hour. The only sound in the forest now, was the crunching of autumn leaves beneath Soil’s bare feet. He wandered the woodland… Alone, completely alone. As the sun rose the following morning, Soil packed a small bark woven bag with food and prepared himself for the walk ahead. He knew something detrimental must have happened to the woods and his brother was still missing. He felt that now was a time that brothers should stick together, not fade apart. So he ventured out into the boundless, noiseless woods in hopes of finding his older sibling, River. The sun and moon danced across the skies for three days, the whole time Soil trudged onward. He followed a shallow stream that, if traced back, meandered all the way to his precious humble garden. For three days however, Soil found nothing. He took a break when the sun was at it’s highest on the fourth day, cupping some fresh water from the stream within his hands, sipping at it carefully. Out of nowhere a voice called out to him. “Soil… Is that you?” It was an unearthly calling, in a harsh, guttural tone. Soil looked up startled, as he hadn’t heard a sound from something other than himself in days. “Hello..?” he asked timidly, “Is there someone there?” “It’s me Soil. Your brother.” The voice replied, the barer of which was hidden from sight on the other side of the small brook. Soil clambered to his feet, his mossy green eyes searched for any possible signs of movement. “River? Where are you?! I’ve been looking for you for days! Something bad has happened to the forest, come home River. Please!” “I cannot.” The husky voice replied. “You would not be safe.” “Not be safe? But you are my brother, you would never harm me!” “That’s true, but I’m afraid that I am no longer myself, Dear brother.” “What are you saying..? What’s happened?” Soil stood passive, staring aimlessly over the river. He heard something move behind one of the trees that stood on the opposite him. He watched as an enormous bat like wing slowly folded out from behind a large tree trunk. Another wing stretched out from the opposite side, however this time it was a large feathered wing of an owl. Soil took a few steps back, as a bout of trembles set within his body. The hulking beast proceeded to reveal itself fully to Soil, stepping out into the open. It was a hair raising sight. The beast was a horrific mis-mash of different woodland animals, fused together in a seamless manner. Yet it maintained an unnatural and unnerving air about itself. It’s head was unmistakeably that of a fox and it’s large giant body was that of a badger. It retained the badgers striking facial patterns, black and white stripes adorn it’s sleek and slender fox like face like war paint. It stood proudly upon four large claws which adorned each of it’s large paws. A pair of twisted, grisly stag horns protruded from it’s brow which was covered in sharp black quills, which ran from the top of it’s head and ran all the way down it’s spine. It’s two wings slowly folded back neatly on either side of the beast’s massive body. A set of crystal blue eyes looked across at Soil. The beasts frothing jaws opened, “Soil… It’s me. It’s River.” “What’s happened to you..? …What have you done?!” Soil asked in horror. “I’ve eaten it all Soil, every bird, insect, fish, fox and deer. I’ve consumed every pathetic life form in this woodland. Now the forest is silent and the only beings left is you and I.” “Why.. Why have you done this?” “Because I can and nothing can compare to my grandiose or my  […]